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2009年12月六级听力试题及答案(含原文)

时间:2012-02-28


2009 年 12 月 Section A 11. A) They would rather travel around than stay at home. B) They prefer to carry cash when traveling abroad. C) They usually carry many things around with them. D) They don’t like to spend much money on traveling. 12. A) The selection process was a little unfair. B) He had long dreamed of the dean’s position. C) Rod was eliminated in the selection process. D) Rod was in charge of the admissions office. 13. A) Applause encourages the singer. B) She regrets paying for the concert. C) Almost everyone loves pop music. D) The concert is very impressive. 14. A) They have known each other since their schooldays. B) They were both chairpersons of the Students’ Union. C) They have been in close touch by email. D) They are going to hold a reunion party. 15. A) Cook their dinner. B) Rest for a while. C) Get their car fixed. D) Stop for the night. 16. A) Newly-launched products. B) Consumer preferences. C) Survey results. D) Survey methods. 17. A) He would rather the woman didn’t buy the blouse. B) The woman needs blouses in the colors of a rainbow. C) The information in the catalog is not always reliable. D) He thinks the blue blouse is better than the red one. 18. A) The course is open to all next semester. B) The notice may not be reliable. C) The woman has not told the truth. D) He will drop his course in marketing. Questions 19 to 22 are based on the conversation you have just heard. 19. A) A director of a sales department. B) A manager at a computer store. C) A sales clerk at a shopping center. D) An accountant of a computer firm. 20. A) Handling customer complaints. B) Recruiting and training new staff. C) Dispatching ordered goods on time. D) Developing computer programs. 21. A) She likes something more challenging.

B) She likes to be nearer to her parents. C) She wants to have a better-paid job. D) She wants to be with her husband. 22. A) Right away. B) In two months. C) Early next month. D) In a couple of days. Questions 23 to 25 are based on the conversation you have just heard. 23. A) It will face challenges unprecedented in its history. B) It is a resolute advocate of the anti-global movement. C) It is bound to regain its full glory of a hundred years ago. D) It will be a major economic power by the mid-21st century. 24. A) The lack of overall urban planning. B) The huge gap between the haves and have-nots. C) The inadequate supply of water and electricity. D) The shortage of hi-tech personnel. 25. A) They attach great importance to education. B) They are able to grasp growth opportunities. C) They are good at learning from other nations. D) They have made use of advanced technologies. Section B Directions: In this section, you will hear 3 short passages. At the end of each passage, you will hear some questions. Both the passage and the questions will be spoken only once. After you hear a question, you must choose the best answer from the four choices marked A), B), C) and D). Then mark the corresponding letter on Answer Sheet 2 with a single line through the centre. Passage One Questions 26 to 29 are based on the passage you have just heard. 26. A) She taught chemistry and microbiology courses in a college. B) She gave lectures on how to become a public speaker. C) She helped families move away from industrial polluters. D) She engaged in field research on environmental pollution. 27. A) The job restricted her from revealing her findings. B) The job posed a potential threat to her health. C) She found the working conditions frustrating. D) She was offered a better job in a minority community. 28. A) Some giant industrial polluters have gone out of business. B) More environmental organizations have appeared. C) Many toxic sites in America have been cleaned up. D) More branches of her company have been set up. 29. A) Her widespread influence among members of Congress. B) Her ability to communicate through public speaking. C) Her rigorous training in delivering eloquent speeches. D) Her lifelong commitment to domestic and global issues. Passage Two

Questions 30 to 32 are based on the passage you have just heard. 30. A) The fierce competition in the market. B) The growing necessity of staff training. C) The accelerated pace of globalisation. D) The urgent need of a diverse workforce. 31. A) Gain a deep understanding of their own culture. B) Take courses of foreign languages and cultures. C) Share the experiences of people from other cultures. D) Participate in international exchange programmes. 32. A) Reflective thinking is becoming critical. B) Labor market is getting globalised. C) Knowing a foreign language is essential. D) Globalisation will eliminate many jobs. Passage Three Questions 33 to 35 are based on the passage you have just heard. 33. A) Red-haired women were regarded as more reliable. B) Brown-haired women were rated as more capable. C) Golden-haired women were considered attractive. D) Black-haired women were judged to be intelligent. 34. A) They are smart and eloquent. B) They are ambitious and arrogant. C) They are shrewd and dishonest. D) They are wealthy and industrious. 35. A) They force people to follow the cultural mainstream. B) They exaggerate the roles of certain groups of people. C) They emphasize diversity at the expense of uniformity. D) They hinder our perception of individual differences. Section C The ancient Greeks developed basic memory systems called mnemonics. The name is 36 from their Goddess of memory “Mnemosyne”. In the ancient world, a trained memory was an 37 asset, particularly in public life. There were no 38 devices for taking notes, and early Greek orators(演说 家) delivered long speeches with great 39 because they learned the speeches using mnemonic systems. The Greeks discovered that human memory is 40 an associative process—that it works by linking things together. For example, think of an apple. The 41 your brain registers the word “apple”, it 42 the shape, color, taste, smell and 43 of that fruit. All these things are associated in your memory with the word “apple”. 44. An example could be when you think about a lecture you have had. This could trigger a memory about what you’re talking about through that lecture, which can then trigger another memory. 45. An example given on a website I was looking at follows: Do you remember the shape of Austria, Canada, Belgium, or Germany? Probably not. What about Italy, though? 46. You made an association with something already known, the shape of a boot, and Italy’s shape could not be forgotten once you had made the association.

答案 11. A) They prefer to carry cash when traveling abroad。 12. C) Rod was eliminated in the selection process。 13. A) The concert is very impressive。 14. B) They have known each other since their schooldays。 15. D) Stop for the night。 16. A) Survey results。 17. D) He would rather the woman didn’t buy the blouse。 18. C) The notice may not be reliable。 19. D) A manager at a computer store。 20. A) Handling customer complaints。 21. C) She wants to be with her husband。 22. D) Early next month。 23. B) It will be a najor economic power by the mid-21st century。 24. D) The huge gap between the haves and have-nots。 25. C) they attach great importance to education。 Section B 26. A) She engaged in field research on enviromental pollution。 27. A) The job restricted her from revealing her findings。 28. B) Many toxic sites in America have been cleaned up。 29. D) Her ability to communicate through public speaking。 30. D) The accelerated pace of globlalisation。 31. B) Gain a deep understanding of their own culture。 32. C) The labour market is getting globalised。 33. B) Brown-haired women are rated as ore capabe。 34. A) They are shrewd dishonest。 35. C) They hinder our perception of individual differences。 36. derived 37. immense 38. convenient 39. accuracy 40. largely 41. instinct 42. recalls 43. texture 44. This means that any thought about a certain subject will often bring up more memories that are related to it。 45. The associations do not have to be logical. They just have to make a good link。 46. If you remember the shape of Italy, it is because you have been told sometime that Italy is shaped like a boot。

2009 年 12 月英语六级真题听力原文 Section A 11.W: Did you use credit cards on your vacation last month in Europe? M: Sure I did. They certainly beat going around with a wallet full of big bills. But carrying lots of cash is still very common among some older people traveling abroad. Q: What does the man say about some elderly people? 12.W: Rod must be in a bad mood today. What’s wrong with him? M: He was passed over in the selection process for the dean of the admissions office. He’d been hoping for the position for a long time. Q: What does the man mean? 13.M: What a great singer Justin is! His concert is just awesome. And you’ll never regret the money you paid for the ticket. W: Yeah. Judging by the amount of the applause, everyone was enjoying it. Q: What does the woman mean? 14.W: I received an email yesterday from Henry. Do you remember? He was one of the chairpersons of our students union. M: Yes, but I haven’t heard from him for ages. Actually I’ve been out of touch with him since our first reunion after graduation. Q: What do we learn about the speakers? 15.M: Driving at night always makes me tired. Let’s stop for dinner. W: Fine. And let’s find a motel, so that we can get an early start tomorrow. Q: What will the speakers probably do? 16.W: Let’s look at the survey on consumer confidence we conducted last week. How reliable are these figures? M: They have a 5% margin of error Q: What are the speakers talking about? 17.W: Look at this catalogue, John. I think I want to get this red blouse. M: Err, I think you’ve already one like this in blue. Do you need every color in the rainbow? Q: What does the man mean? 18.W: This notice says that all the introductory marketing classes are closed. M: That can’t be true. There’s supposed to be 13 of them this semester. Q: What does the man mean? Conversation One

M: I see on your resume that you worked as a manager of a store called “Computer Country”. Could you tell me a little more about your responsibilities there? W: Sure. I was responsible for overseeing about 30 employees. I did all of the ordering for the store, and I kept track of the inventory. M: What was the most difficult part of your job? W: Probably handling angry customers. We didn’t have them very often, but when we did, I needed to make sure they were well taken care of. After all, the customer is always right. M: That’s how we feel here too. How long did you work there? W: I was there for three and a half years. I left the company last month. M: And why did you leave? W: My husband has been transferred to Boston. And I understand your company has an opening there too. M: Yes, that’s right. We do. But the position won’t start until early next month. Would that be a problem for you? W: No, not at all. My husband’s new job doesn’t begin for a few weeks. So we thought we would spend some time driving to Boston and stop to see my parents. M: That sounds nice. So tell me, why are you interested in this particular position? W: I know that your company has a great reputation, and a wonderful product. I’ve thought many times that I would like to be a part of it. When I heard about the opening in Boston, I jumped to the opportunity. M: Well I’m glad you did. 19. What was the woman’s previous job? 20. What does the woman say was the most difficult part of her job? 21. Why is the woman looking for a job in Boston? 22. When can the woman start to work if she gets the job? Conversation Two W: Today in the studio we have Alberto Cortez, the well-known Brazilian advocate of the anti-global movement. He’s here to talk about the recent report, stating that by 2050 Brazil will be the one ot the word’s wealthiest and most successful countries. Alberto, what do you say to the report? M: You know this isn’t the first time that people are saying Brazil will be a great economic power. The same thing was said over a hundred year ago. But it didn’t happen. W: Yes, but you must admit the world’s a very different place now. M: Of course. In fact I believe there’s maybe some truth in the prediction this time around. First of all, though, we must remember the problems facing Brazil at the moment. W: Such as…? M: There’s an enormous gap between the rich and the poor in this country. In Sal Paulo, you can see shopping malls full of designer goods right next door to the slam areas without proper water and electricity supplies. A lot of work needs to be done to

help people in those areas improve their lives. W: What needs to be done? M: Education, for example. For Brazil to be successful, we need to offer education to all Brazilians. Successful countries like South Korea and Singapore have excellent education systems. Brazil needs to learn from these countries. W: So you are hopeful for the future. M: As I said earlier, I’m hopeful. This isn’t an easy job. We need to make sure that these important opportunities for Brazil aren’t wasted, as they were in the past. 23. What does the recent report say about Brazil? 24. What problem does Alberto say Brazil faces now? 25. What does Alberto say about economically successful countries? Section B Passage One Wilma Subra had no intention of becoming a public speaker. After graduating from college with degrees in chemistry and microbiology, she went to work at Gulf South Research Institute in Louisiana. As part of her job, she conducted field research on toxic substances in the environment, often in minority communities located near large industrial polluters. She found many families were being exposed high, sometimes deadly, levels of chemicals and other toxic substances, but she was not allowed to make her information public. Frustrated by these restrictions, Subra left her job in 1981, created her own company, and has devoted the past two decades to helping people fight back against giant industrial polluters. She works with families and community groups to conduct environmental tests, interpret test results, and organize for change. Because of her efforts, dozens of toxic sites across the country have been cleaned up, and one chemical industry spokesperson calls her “a top gun for the environmental movement.” How has Wilma Subra achieved all this? Partly through her scientific training, partly through her commitment to environmental justice. But just as important is her ability to communicate with people through public speaking. “Public speaking,” she says, “is the primary vehicle I use for reaching people.” If you had asked Subra before 1981, “Do you see yourself as a major public speaker?” She would have laughed at the idea. Yet today she gives more than 100 presentations a year. Along the way she has lectured at Harvard, testified before Congress, and addressed audiences in 40 states, as well as in Mexico, Canada, and Japan. 26. What did Wilma Subra do as part of her job while working at Gulf South Research Institute? 27. What did Wilma Subra leave her job in 1981? 28. What results have Wilma Subra’s efforts had in the part two decades? 29. What does the speaker say has contributed to Wilma Subra’s success? Passage 2 One of the biggest challenges facing employers and educators today is the rapid advance of globalization. The market place is no longer national or regional, but

extends to all corners of the world. And this requires a global ready workforce. Universities have a large part to play in preparing students for the 21st century labor market by promoting international educational experiences. The most obvious way universities can help develop global workforce is by encouraging students to study abroad as part of their course. Students who have experienced another culture first hand are more likely to be global ready when they graduate. Global workforce development doesn’t always have to involve travel abroad however. If students learn another language and study other cultures, they will be more global ready when they graduate. It is important to point out that students also need to have a deep understanding of their own culture before they can begin to observe, analyze and evaluate other cultures. In multi-cultural societies, people can study each other’s cultures, to develop intercultural competencies, such as critical and reflective thinking, and intellectual flexibility. This can be done both through the curriculum and through activities on campus, outside of the classroom, such as art exhibitions, and lectures from international experts. Many universities are already embracing this challenge, and providing opportunities for students to become global citizens. Students themselves, however, may not realize that when they graduate, they will be competing in a global labor market, and universities need to raise awareness of these issues amongst undergraduates. Questions 30-32 Q30: What is one of the biggest challenges facing employers and educators today? Q31: What should students do first before they can really understand other cultures? Q32: What should college students realize according to the speaker? Passage 3 To see if hair color affects a person’s chances of getting a job, researchers at California State University asked 136 college students to review the resume and photograph of a female applicant for a job as an accountant. Each student was given the same resume. But the applicant’s picture was altered, so that in some photos her hair was golden, in some red and in some brown. The result? With brown hair, the woman was rated more capable, and she was offered a higher salary than when she had golden or red hair. Other studies have found similar results. Many respondents rate women with golden hair with less intelligent than other people, and red heads as more temperamental. Women with red or golden hair are victims of the common practice of stereotyping. A stereotype is a simplistic or exaggerated image that humans carrying in their minds about groups of people. For example, lawyers are shrewd and dishonest is a popular stereotype. Stereotyping can occur in public speaking classes. When trying to choose a speech topic, some males think that women are uninterested in how to repair cars, while some females think that men are uninterested in creative hobbies, such as knitting and needle point. We should reject stereotypes, because they force all people in a group into the same simple pattern. They fail to account for individual differences, and the wide range of characteristics among members of any group. Some lawyers are

dishonest, yes! But many are not. Some women are uninterested in repairing cars, yes! But some are enthusiastic mechanics. Questions 33-35 Q33: What did researchers at California State University find? Q34: What is the popular stereotype of lawyers? Q35: Why does the speaker say we should reject stereotypes? Section C The ancient Greeks developed basic memory systems called mnemonics. The name is derived from their Goddess of memory "Mnemosyne". In the ancient world, a trained memory was an immense asset, particularly in public life. There were no convenient devices for taking notes, and early Greek orators delivered long speeches with great accuracy because they learned the speeches using mnemonic systems. The Greeks discovered that human memory is largely an associative process that it works by linking things together. For example, think of an apple. The instant your brain registers the word "apple", it recalls the shape, color, taste, smell and texture of that fruit. All these things are associated in your memory with the word "apple". This means that any thought about a certain subject will often bring up more memories that are related to it. An example could be when you think about a lecture you have had. This could trigger a memory about what you're talking about through that lecture, which can then trigger another memory. Associations do not have to be logical. They just have to make a good link. An example given on a website I was looking at follows, "Do you remember the shape of Austria? Canada? Belgium? Or Germany? Probably not. What about Italy though? If you remember the shape of Italy, it is because you have been told at some time that Italy is shaped like a boot. You made an association with something already known, the shape of a boot. And Italy shape could not be forgotten once you had made the association."

2009 年 6 月英语六级真题听力原文 短对话: 11. W: I forgot to tell you that Fred called last night to borrow your sleeping bag. M: Oh, I saw him at the gym this morning, but he didn’t say anything. So he must have asked somebody else. Q: What does the man imply? 12. W: These summer days are getting to be more than I can take. It was even too hot to go to the pool yesterday. M: Hang in there. According to the weather report we should have some relief by the end of the week. Q: What does the man mean? 13. W: Well, tonight we have Professor Brown in our studio to talk about the famous oil painting of Queen Victoria. Good evening, professor. M: Good evening, madam, my pleasure to be here tonight. Q: What is the woman doing? 14. M: The plants next to the window always look brown. You wouldn’t know by

looking at them that I water them every week. W: Maybe they don’t like direct sunlight. I had the same problem with some of my plants. And a little shade helps them immensely. Q: What does the woman imply? Long conversation one W: You’re the editor of Public Eye. What kind of topics does your program cover? M: Well, there are essentially domestic stories. We don’t cover international stories. We don’t cover party politics or economics. We do issues of general social concern to our British audience. They can be anything from the future of the health service to the way the environment is going downhill. W: How do you choose the topic? Do you choose one because it’s what the public wants to know about or because it’s what you feel the public ought to know about? M: I think it’s a mixture of both. Sometimes you have a strong feeling that something is important and you want to see it examined and you want to contribute to a public debate. Sometimes people come to you with things they are worried about and they can be quite small things. They can be a story about corruption in local government, something they cannot quite understand, why it doesn’t seem to be working out properly, like they are not having their litter collected properly or the dustbins emptied. W: How do you know that you’ve got a really successful program? One that is just right for the time? M: I think you get a sense about it after working in it in a number of years. You know which stories are going to get the attention. They are going to be published just the point when the public are concerned about that. Q19-21 19. What kind of topics does Public Eye cover? 20. How does Public Eye choose its topics? 21. What factor plays an important role in running a successful program? W: Hi, Professor Smith. I hear you’ve written a book titled Visions. M: Yes. It explains how science will revolutionize the 21st century. W: Could I ask you some questions concerning the book? M: Sure. W: Are you optimistic about the future? M: Generally, yeah. If we go back to the year of 1900, most Americans didn’t live beyond the age of 50. Since then, we’ve had improvements in health care and technology. There is no reason why these won’t continue far into the 21st century. W: Are we ready for the changes that will come? M: Changes are already happening. The future is here now. We have DNA, microchips, the internet. Some people’s reaction is to say, we are too old; we don’t understand new technology. My reaction is to say, we must educate people to use new technology now. W: Is world population going to be a big problem?

M: Yes, and no. I think that world population will stop increasing as we all get richer. If you are a part of the middle class, you don’t want or need 12 children. W: Will there be a world government? M: Very probably. We will have to manage the world and its resources on a global level because countries alone are too small. W: Will we have control of everything? M:I think we’ll learn to control the weather, volcanoes and earthquakes. Illness won’t exist. We’ll grow new livers, kidneys, hearts, and lungs like spare parts for a car. People will live to about 130 or 150. For 2000 years, we have tried to understand our environment. Now we’ll begin to control it. Q22-25 are based on the conversation you just heard. 22. What does Professor Smith say about most Americans around the year of 1900? 23. What does Professor Smith advice we do? 24. When will the world population stop growing according to Professor Smith? 25. What does Professor Smith think human beings will be able to do?


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